Morgan Turinui appointed new boss of Classic Wallabies

by RUGBY.com.au staff

Former Test centre Morgan Turinui has been named as the new General Manager of the Classic Wallabies, replacing the recently departed Justin Harrison.

Turinui, who played 20 Tests for the Wallabies between 2003 and 2005, was appointed as the new “Classics” boss following Harrison’s move to become CEO of the Rugby Union Players Association.

The 37-year-old played for Randwick, NSW and Queensland, as well as playing and coaching at Stade Francais in Paris.

Turinui also served as an assistant coach at the Melbourne Rebels in 2016-17, and has been heavily involved in the Classic Wallabies.

The “Classics” have grown significantly in recent years, and not only serve as a point of connection and welfare for past players but, in collaboration with the Australia Rugby Foundation, also act as a key engagement force for rugby in the community with games and clinics, particularly in the bush.

The Classic Wallabies also do great development work overseas.

"I’m excited to be working with the Australian Rugby community as well as past Australian representative players to build our program and continue the outstanding work done by Justin Harrison and Stephen Hoiles,” Turinui said in a release.


‘’The Classic Wallabies is a well-respected community who are dedicated to helping everyone from the grassroots through to the professional level, as we all have the same golden thread running through us,’’ said Turinui.

Classic Wallabies President Simon Poidevin recognised Harrison’s contribution to the committee and welcomed Turinui into the fold.

“Justin has done a fantastic job cementing the Classic Wallabies brand within the Australian Rugby landscape through matches, events and coaching clinics, particularly in regional areas and across the Pacific in partnership with the Federal Government.

“Morgan’s appointment will allow the Classic Wallabies to build on the foundations laid over the last two years and evolve into an ever more represented body in the Australian sporting landscape.”