Wallabies dealt more Twickenham pain

International
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by Beth Newman

The Wallabies have been dealt more Twickenham pain, going down to England 30-6 on Saturday, their fifth consecutive defeat at England's hands.

Their loss makes this their equal-longest losing streak against England since a run of defeats going from 2000-2003, with a six-point half-time deficit turning into 24 by the final whistle.

Australia trailed all afternoon on a dismal afternoon, facing a two-man handicap by the break, up against some controversial refereeing decisions that left coach Michael Cheika fuming, and mistakes of their own making.

The penalty count finished up even but captain Michael Hooper was sent off for the second week in a row for repeated infringements, with fullback Kurtley Beale binned for a deliberate knock down, just before half-time.

Though they dealt with their adversity well, actually kicking three points to nil in that time, it was the times where they were on level pegging that England made the most of.

The slippery conditions didn’t stop England trying to chance their arm given the opportunity, but it was off the boot of Owen Farrell that the found their first points in the sixth minute.

The Wallabies and England played out a gruelling contest. Photo: getty IMagesAustralia had expected the English to get in their faces and the home side did exactly that, forcing the Wallabies to try to look to the outside to try and create some momentum.

Bernard Foley butchered Australia’s first shot at the posts, stabbing at a straightforward shot, keeping the pressure well and truly on the visitors.

Five minutes later, they had a try disallowed after Michael Hooper pounced on a Tevita Kuridrani kick, but was found to be offside, the first of two unlucky TMO reviews.

Kurtley Beale looked dangerous , collecting a contested kick deep in England attack to put the Wallabies on the front foot, but the Wallabies couldn’t turn their half chances into points.

England got in the faces of the Wallabies. Photo: getty ImagesThe Wallabies were forced into another desperate defensive effort on the half-hour mark as England tried to push their way over the line, a job all the harder by the Hooper sin-binning, before Beale was sent four minutes later.

Australia managed to make it through their disadvantage on top, with a Reece Hodge penalty giving them their first points of the evening.

Though they withheld England, Australia couldn’t create their own territory advantage, cut off before the half-way mark.

A cold drop from Tevita Kuridrani was punished with an Elliot Daly try, that was awarded after a marathon TMO review, with the ball seemingly grazing the touch line in England attack.

Kurtley Beale leaps for a ball at Twickenham. Photo: Getty ImagesThe Wallabies broke from the norm when the next penalty chance came in their attacking zone, Foley opting to go for points rather than the corner, to narrow the gap to a converted try.

Samu Kerevi found more space as the game went on, giving Australia crucial metres, as the Wallabies looked for any slice of advantage they could.

Marika Koroibete went within centimetres of evening up the scores in the 70th minute, but the TMO intervened again finding Stephen Moore offside in the tackle, with the England defender questionably coming from the the offside line to create the interference.

England doubled their pain, with Jonathan Joseph sliding over with eight minutes to go, ensuring Australia's pain against England would last another year, before Jony May and Danny Care joined the party in the final minutes, blowing out the scoreline.

The loss was compounded with news that Adam Coleman would be heading home for an operatoin on his injured thumb, ruling him out of the final match against Scotland.

Australia flies to Edinburgh on Sunday, ahead of their final tour match, against Scotland.

RESULT

England 30

Tries: Daly, Joseph, May,  Care

Cons: Farrell 2

Pens: Farrell 2

Australia 6

Pens: Hodge, Foley

Yellow Cards: Hooper (37’), Beale (40’)

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