Rugby Sevens Cross-Field Tackle U8 - 9

. Rugby Sevens Cross-Field Tackle U8-U9

Basics

 

Playing Area

>60m x 35m maximum, i.e. usually ½ field


Time

>Play consists of two 7 minute halves, with a 1 minute halftime. Final matches only may be two 10 minute halves, with a 2 minute half time.


Ball Size

>Size 3


Number of Players

>A team has seven (7) players on field. A team can have a squad of up to players.
>
Teams must match numbers on the field during play.


Substitutions

>Rolling substitutions are allowed and these are unlimited in number, but can only be made when the ball is dead (i.e. the game has stopped.)


Scoring

>A try is scored when a player places the ball on or over the opponents’ goal-line, and it is awarded 5 points.

>Conversions, Drop Goals and Penalty Goals are not permitted.


Playing the Game

 

Kick off

>Kick-offs to begin each half are punt kicks or drop kicks.

>The receiving team at a kick-off must be at least 5m back from half-way.

>The kicking team cannot recover the ball at a kick-off, the receiving team must be given space to field the ball.

>If a kick-off is unsuccessful in any way (eg. wrong kick, doesn’t go 5m, goes dead etc), another chance is provided until the kick is successfully taken.

>After a try, the non-scoring team takes a tap restart from the centre of the half-way line.


Kicking

>There is no kicking allowed in general play (scrum to the opposing team).


Tap Restart

>After an infringement, the referee awards either a scrum, a Free Kick (FK) or a Penalty Kick (PK). All Penalty Kicks and Free Kicks (FK) are taken as a tap restart.

>The opposing team must run back at least 5 metres from the mark.

>At a tap restart, the ball must be either kicked out of the hands, or put on the ground and kicked a visible distance. The player must not hold the ball and tap with the foot without letting go. Another chance is provided until taken correctly.


In-Goal

>If the ball is put into in-goal by the attacking team and it subsequently becomes dead, play will restart with a tap restart at the centre of the 15-metre line by the defending team.

>If the ball is put into in-goal by the defending team and it subsequently becomes dead, play will restart with a 5 metre scrum to the attacking team.


Foul play

>No fending to the face or head allowed (PK).

>No jersey slinging tackles allowed (PK).

>A red card = sent off and cannot return. A yellow card = 2 mins in the sin-bin.

>When a yellow or red card is issued, the player may be replaced.


Knock-on and forward pass

>For the sake of game continuity, referees are encouraged to be lenient on the application of this Law. When the ball is dropped or thrown, the assumption should be that the ball has gone backwards unless it is clearly and obviously forwards.


Advantage

>For the sake of game continuity, referees are encouraged to allow play to continue after an infringement that is followed by an advantage to the non-offending team. This is called ‘advantage’ and is at the sole discretion of the referee.

>Players are encouraged to continue playing until the referee blows his whistle.


The Tackle

 

The tackle

>A tackle occurs when the ball carrier is held by one or more opponents and is brought to ground. “Brought to ground” means a minimum of one knee on the ground.


The tackler

>A tackler is a player who makes a tackle and in the action of making that tackle goes to ground. “Going to ground” means a minimum of one knee on the ground.

>The tackler must first clearly release the tackled player and then either roll away or get to their feet before attempting to play the ball. The tackler must not hold onto the tackled player as they get to their feet.

>A tackler who regains their feet may play the ball from any direction at the tackle.


Players who remain standing in a tackle (Assist Tackler)

>Players who make a tackle or assist in making a tackle but remain on their feet and do not go to ground are not “tacklers”.

>Such a player must clearly release the tackled player and ball before going back to play the ball. This standing and/or assist tackler must show clear release, ie. ‘daylight’.

>Such a player may only play the ball after arriving at the tackle through their gate.

2. Rugby Sevens Cross-Field Tackle U8-U9

The tacked player

>As soon as a tackle has occurred, the tacked player must play the ball by releasing, placing, passing, or pushing the ball.


Arriving Players

>Players who play the ball after a tackle must do so from the direction of their own goal line (ie. ‘through the gate’).

>Arriving players must demonstrate positive intent to stay on their feet. They must arrive supporting their own body weight and not deliberately go to ground to seal possession or deny a contest.


Ruck and Maul

 

After a tackle

>Any player on their feet who has their hands on the ball immediately after a tackle and before a ruck forms is allowed to keep contesting for the ball even if aruck forms around them. No other arriving player at this point may play the ball with their hands.


Ruck

>A ruck is formed when one or more players from each team are on their feet in physical contact around the ball on the ground.

>Players must use their feet to win possession of the ball and must not use their hands.

>Players from both teams not taking part in the ruck must retire to an offside line which runs across the field through the hindmost foot of the hindmost player in the ruck.


Maul

>A maul is formed when the ball carrier is held by an opponent, a teammate of the ball carrier binds on and all players remain on their feet. A maul therefore has a minimum of 3 players, the ball carrier and one or more teammates and one or more opponents.

>Players must not collapse a maul as this is dangerous play.

>Players from both teams not taking part in the maul must retire to an offside line which runs across the field through the hindmost foot of the hindmost player in the maul.


Scrum

 

Scrum setup

>3 players from each team form the scrum.

>Both scrum-halves must stand on the same side of the scrum.

>All other players not taking part in the scrum must be back at least 5 metres.

>If the setup is not right, the referee awards another scrum with the same team throwing in, so the players can get it right.


Scrum play

>Scrum engagement sequence is CROUCH – TOUCH – SET. The new sequence must be a controlled process with a clear non-verbal pause between‘touch’ and ‘set’ to allow front rowers to sight their target.

>There is no pushing in the scrum and the team throwing in the ball must win it.

>After gathering the ball, the scrum-half must pass it to a team-mate.

>If the scrum-half doesn’t pass, the referee awards another scrum with the same team throwing in, so the players canget it right (if there is repeated infringement, a PK may be awarded).


Scrum offside

>The scrum does not end until the ball is either played by a team-mate, or touches the ground, after being passed by the receiver.

>The defending scrum-half cannot go past the midline of the scrum and must stay within 1 metre of the scrum on the feeding side until it is over.

>Opposition players must stay onside or bound until the scrum is over.

>If players are offside, the referee awards a Penalty Kick.


Lineout

 

Lineout setup

>When the ball goes out (‘in touch’) the referee awards a lineout. No quick throw-ins allowed.

>2 players from each team stand as catchers 1 metre from the opposition players in a single line 4 metres away from the touch line.

>The thrower of the team in possession stands opposite their team’s first catcher.

>The thrower’s immediate opponent must stand on their side between the lineout and the touch line, and 2 metres from the line of touch.

>There must be a receiver (scrum-half) 2 metres back from the line-out. The receiver must stay in position until they receive the ball from the lineout.

>All other players not taking part in the line-out must be back at least 5 metres.

>If the setup is not right, the referee awards another lineout with the same team throwing in, so the players can get it right.


Lineout play

>The team throwing the ball in must win it.

>The ball is passed or knocked to the receiver who must then pass it to a team-mate.

>If the wrong team wins the ball or the receiver doesn’t pass, the referee awards another lineout with the same team throwing in, so the players can get it right (if there is repeated infringement, a PK may be awarded).


Lineout offside

>The lineout does not end until the ball is either played by a team-mate, or touches the ground, after being passed by the receiver.

>Opposition backline players must stay onside and lineout players must stay in the lineout until the line-out is over.

>If players are offside, the referee awards a Penalty Kick.