Juggling act throws up Olympic opportunity

Beth Newman Profile
by Beth Newman

A seven-year juggling act has reaped rewards for Anthony Moyes, one of two Australian referees to become the first to officiate in an Olympic Games.

The announcement was something of a relief for Moyes, who has had the Olympics in the back of his mind since Rugby re-joined the Games.

“We’ve known about the potential of being appointed for about 5 years, so we’ve been working towards it for at least that long,” he said.

“To know we’ve finally been appointed is a relief and it’s a nice acknowledgement of effort and hard work.”

Moyes is the most experienced Sevens referee on the circuit, having whistled more than 200 games, and Rio is set to be his swansong.

He still remembers the first match he officiated, though as much for the quirks as quality of play.

“My first tournament was in Dubai and my first game was between New Zealand and Arabian Gulf, that’s a team that doesn’t even exist anymore,” he said.

“New Zealand scored lots of points and I felt like a bit of novice but it didn’t really matter because it was so one-sided.”

Moyes will be joined by trailblazing referee Amy Perrett, who recently refereed two matches of the Women’s Six Nations.

Perrett is yet to travel to Brazil, after injuries and a visa issue prevented her from officiating at the Sao Paulo Women’s Sevens tournament.

“I missed out on two opportunities to go to Brazil for the first time. First one was a visa issue - not knowing I needed a visa, so I’m really excited for this opportunity.”

For Perrett, it’s as much a dream as it is for any athlete set to compete at the Olympics.

“I mean it’s hard to explain,” she said.

“It’s something you've wanted for so long and it's almost there.

“I just want to stay injury free but similar to the athletes it’s an incredible feeling that you’ll be representing your country in a big game.

“It’s really hard to describe.”

Perrett said she hoped to leave a positive mark on the Olympic tournament.

“I’m really proud Anthony and I can go and represent our country,” she said.

“Hopefully we can do a good job and leave a good legacy.”

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